Why Facebook’s New Cryptocurrency Is a threat to Mpesa and Safaricom

Using blockchain and cryptocurrencies, popular internet platforms, are about to disrupt Mpesa in East Africa, the same way Mpesa disrupted banks.

According to sources, Facebook Is Developing a Cryptocurrency for WhatsApp Transfers known a Facebookcoin. If true, this spells doom for Mpesa and Safaricom as they will soon end up as a commodified dumb pipe, like a utility company resigned to a passive role in the medium to long term future.

Popular internet platforms in East Africa have grown beyond social, and now support value exchange within their closed environments – for example Facebook  and whatsapp, both social platforms where people engage in online trade and biashara.

By adding a US dollar pegged coin known as a stablecoin within its virtual network, more value can be captured and retained within the network until it is absolutely necessary to cash out into local currency.

Facebookcoin, platform based currencies and network cryptocurrencies pose a threat to Mpesa just because of the sheer size of the networks they command and everything that goes on within them. This is great news for Fintech startups and banks in East Africa who can reinvent themselves in a post Mpesa world.

Here is how I see it.

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How the Central Bank Of Kenya Plans To Regulate Bitcoin and Cryptocurrencies

Rather than fight change, the Central Bank of Kenya now seems to be reconsidering its stance on cryptocurrencies as a radically new way of high-speed, low-cost value transfer independent of traditional financial intermediaries.

Bitcoin and cryptocurrencies are a puzzle especially for regulators. Over the last 4 years our dear Central Bank Governor, Dr. Patrick Njoroge has consistently been opposed to the idea of cryptocurrencies. He issued 2 damning public notices warning the public to stay away and another circular expressly requesting banks to choke any value transfer activity related to cryptocurrencies.

As per the Central Bank of Kenya Act, he is well within his right. A bank is a regulated private business. You cannot compel a bank to take you as a customer or take your business. Thus, every once in a while, the governor pulls out his trump card to remind us who is boss.

But mounting pressure has pinned the old man against the wall, forcing him to revisit his dogmatism. An article from the Standard dated May 23rd titled “CBK Warms Up to Cryptocurrencies”  read

“CBK Governor Patrick Njoroge said the regulator was open to introducing cryptocurrencies such as bitcoin as alternative payment vehicles with the opportunity to reduce fraud.”

While in the past, all the the financial instruments that intermediary companies use for fund transfers were based on fiat currencies, in the forms of cash, bank deposits and electronic money – it is no longer the case with the advent of Bitcoin.

Rather than fight change, the Central Bank of Kenya now seems to be reconsidering its stance on cryptocurrencies as a radically new way of high-speed, low-cost value transfer independent of traditional financial intermediaries.

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