Why Africans are not Just Passive Recipients of Technology

Should technology solutions aimed at the developing world, seek to build on and enhance indigenous, activities — economic or otherwise — or, where necessary, is it okay just to replace and lose them?

By Ken Banks

In Ghana, it’s popularly known as Susu. In Cameroon, Tontines or Chilembe. And in South Africa, stokfel. Today, you’d most likely call it plain-old microfinance, the nearest term we have for it.

Age-old indigenous credit schemes have run perfectly well without much outside intervention for generations. Although, in our excitement to implement new technologies and solutions, we sometimes fail to recognize them.

Innovations such as mobile banking – great as they may be – are hailed as revolutionary without much consideration for what may have come before, or who the original innovators may have been.

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Why the Legacy of Uber’s App and Business Model in Africa will outlive the company

The legacy that Uber will leave behind in Africa’s mobile first decentralized digital economic ecosystem is the ability of a simple algorithm to collate disparate sources of demand for goods or services, and then redistribute them in the most efficient and productive manner among suppliers.

By Niti Bhan, 

As news of Uber’s possible decline and fall filters in, it behooves me to take a moment to ponder the implications for sub Saharan Africa’s digital economic ecosystem, particularly, the decentralized hybrid one emerging among the erstwhile informal sectors of the economy, such as motorcycle taxis like Safeboda and other on demand services.

While Uber itself has made waves in all the major urban metros across the African continent – Lagos, Nairobi, Johannesburg, etc – its inevitable end will leave a greater legacy than simply copycat taxi hailing services.

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Why Facebook’s New Cryptocurrency Is a threat to Mpesa and Safaricom

Using blockchain and cryptocurrencies, popular internet platforms, are about to disrupt Mpesa in East Africa, the same way Mpesa disrupted banks.

According to sources, Facebook Is Developing a Cryptocurrency for WhatsApp Transfers known a Facebookcoin. If true, this spells doom for Mpesa and Safaricom as they will soon end up as a commodified dumb pipe, like a utility company resigned to a passive role in the medium to long term future.

Popular internet platforms in East Africa have grown beyond social, and now support value exchange within their closed environments – for example Facebook  and whatsapp, both social platforms where people engage in online trade and biashara.

By adding a US dollar pegged coin known as a stablecoin within its virtual network, more value can be captured and retained within the network until it is absolutely necessary to cash out into local currency.

Facebookcoin, platform based currencies and network cryptocurrencies pose a threat to Mpesa just because of the sheer size of the networks they command and everything that goes on within them. This is great news for Fintech startups and banks in East Africa who can reinvent themselves in a post Mpesa world.

Here is how I see it.

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How Digital Platforms are Shaping Africa’s Informal Economy

A new digital generation of informal African entrepreneurs have adopted and adapted gig economy tools and digital platforms to meet their needs for a flexible and negotiable digital marketplace. Apps that can drive demand and scale reach affordably are transforming African markets, opening up new opportunities for young Africans.

With contribution from Niti Bhan

When people think about the informal economy, this is the picture that often comes to mind.

What is often forgotten, is that the next generation of informal economy actors – mama mbogas, boda boda okada riders, wakulima farmers, traders, taxi drivers, matatu touts, drivers et cetera in Kenya and East Africa will be vastly different from the women depicted here.

The coming generation of Africa’s informal economy are today’s millennial digital natives – hungry, educated, exposed to global trends, with all the tools available to them like everyone else anywhere in the world. Only with no prospects of formal employment on the horizon.

‘Informal’ is no longer synonymous to the streets, associated with the roadside, automatically defaulting to the marginalized or vulnerable – it is not a disease to recover from. The informal economy is an equal opportunity, organized and commercial operating environment offering Africans the chance to achieve their aspirations.

Africa’s prosperous future will only be realized by embracing the informal. This is not a choice.

While my thoughts are presented in the context of East Africa, I believe it resonates with the broader, global ‘gig’ economy. So perhaps my 60,000 ft view from Nairobi, East Africa rings true for the rest of the world.

Allow me to paint a picture for you using one of the sectors of the informal economy – trade.

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Blockchain, Identity, Chamas and Africa: A Q & A with Ian Grigg

Way before bitcoin and the blockchain, Ian Grigg was part of a vibrant group of pioneers that pursued the vision of digital cash and financial cryptography in the 90s – what is now call blockchain. It is an understatement to say he has seen it all.

By God! There is too much noise in the blockchain industry. I know because I live it everyday; have been living it for the past 5 years.

Over time, I have devised a method to navigate and filter out the practical and realistic from the bold, utopian-dream proclamations. The trick is to seek out and follow the more sober-headed minds in the industry; these are the older wiser tech heads and the level-headed critics in the industry.

Ian grigg is one of them.

Ian Grigg is an architect and financial cryptographer who has been building, auditing and consulting for cryptographic ledger platforms for over 20 years. Way before bitcoin and the blockchain, he was part of a vibrant group of pioneers that pursued the vision of digital cash and financial cryptography in the 90s – what is now call blockchain. It is an understatement to say he has seen it all.

He is mostly known for 3 accomplishments (amongst others)

Co-inventor of the Triple Entry Accounting Ledger, a concept that sparked the explosion of a $400 billion Bitcoin, cryptocurrency and blockchain industry – bitcoin is the world’s first triple ledger entry system at scale.

The inventor of the Ricardian contract, a canonical design pattern for tying legal contracts into digital assets issued over the internet. His work on Ricardian Contracts foreshadowed today’s blockchain smart contracts.

Confirming the identity of 2 of the members of the team Satoshi Nakamoto that birthed Bitcoin – Craig Wright and Dave Kleiman

More recently, Ian was an architect consultant for one of the world’s largest consortium based distributed ledger protocol, R3 Corda, formed by 43 of the world’s largest banks, a partner at the $4 billion EOS blockchain for business and commercial scale and an audit consultant for Senegal’s Digital Currency roll out masterplan for Francophone Africa, serving under eCurrencyMint on behalf of Omidyar Network.

Today, Ian is a cofounder and Chief Technology officer at Chamapesa, a project using blockchain elements to digitize the indigenous culture of social savings and investments that is prevalent across Africa and the developing world. Ian believes the Chama groups of Kenya and savings groups communities in Africa and Latin America hold the key to designing identity systems for a blockchain powered internet economy.

So when Ian speaks, you listen and pay attention.

I managed to lock him down for a question and answer session, probing his mind on Blockchain, Identity, Chamas and Africa.

Whatever your opinions, what follows is one of the best bits of wisdom  you will come across on the interwebs.

Enjoy!

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How Africa’s Airtime Currency Traders Birthed A Fintech Innovation Playbook

This is a story of how informal airtime currency resellers of Africa birthed mPesa, mobile money, and an innovation playbook for Africa’s emerging economy.

Not everyone can see it.

If you are keen though, you’ll realize Africa’s informal economy is an open playbook on how to innovate, build and scale successful products and services for the emerging African consumers. Ask me how I know, and I’ll point you to the little known story of prepaid airtime currency re-sellers in Africa who, by cobbling up a rudimentary hack, were able to model a country-wide money transfer network, that would later be adopted by Africa’s telecommunication companies (Telco), spun off into a massive revenue generating business to eventually dethrone the monopoly of banks in East Africa.

But the real story is neither about airtime, nor Telcos. What it is really about are the lessons we can draw upon Africa’s informal economy on how to approach innovation in Africa.

This is a story of how the prepaid airtime re-sellers of Africa not only birthed mPesa, and mobile money, but an innovation playbook for Africa’s emerging economy.

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