Blockchain, Identity, Chamas and Africa: A Q & A with Ian Grigg

Way before bitcoin and the blockchain, Ian Grigg was part of a vibrant group of pioneers that pursued the vision of digital cash and financial cryptography in the 90s – what is now call blockchain. It is an understatement to say he has seen it all.

By God! There is too much noise in the blockchain industry. I know because I live it everyday; have been living it for the past 5 years.

Over time, I have devised a method to navigate and filter out the practical and realistic from the bold, utopian-dream proclamations. The trick is to seek out and follow the more sober-headed minds in the industry; these are the older wiser tech heads and the level-headed critics in the industry.

Ian grigg is one of them.

Ian Grigg is an architect and financial cryptographer who has been building, auditing and consulting for cryptographic ledger platforms for over 20 years. Way before bitcoin and the blockchain, he was part of a vibrant group of pioneers that pursued the vision of digital cash and financial cryptography in the 90s – what is now call blockchain. It is an understatement to say he has seen it all.

He is mostly known for 3 accomplishments (amongst others)

Co-inventor of the Triple Entry Accounting Ledger, a concept that sparked the explosion of a $400 billion Bitcoin, cryptocurrency and blockchain industry – bitcoin is the world’s first triple ledger entry system at scale.

The inventor of the Ricardian contract, a canonical design pattern for tying legal contracts into digital assets issued over the internet. His work on Ricardian Contracts foreshadowed today’s blockchain smart contracts.

Confirming the identity of 2 of the members of the team Satoshi Nakamoto that birthed Bitcoin – Craig Wright and Dave Kleiman

More recently, Ian was an architect consultant for one of the world’s largest consortium based distributed ledger protocol, R3 Corda, formed by 43 of the world’s largest banks, a partner at the $4 billion EOS blockchain for business and commercial scale and an audit consultant for Senegal’s Digital Currency roll out masterplan for Francophone Africa, serving under eCurrencyMint on behalf of Omidyar Network.

Today, Ian is a cofounder and Chief Technology officer at Chamapesa, a project using blockchain elements to digitize the indigenous culture of social savings and investments that is prevalent across Africa and the developing world. Ian believes the Chama groups of Kenya and savings groups communities in Africa and Latin America hold the key to designing identity systems for a blockchain powered internet economy.

So when Ian speaks, you listen and pay attention.

I managed to lock him down for a question and answer session, probing his mind on Blockchain, Identity, Chamas and Africa.

Whatever your opinions, what follows is one of the best bits of wisdom  you will come across on the interwebs.

Enjoy!

Continue reading “Blockchain, Identity, Chamas and Africa: A Q & A with Ian Grigg”

How Africa’s Airtime Currency Traders Birthed A Fintech Innovation Playbook

This is a story of how informal airtime currency resellers of Africa birthed mPesa, mobile money, and an innovation playbook for Africa’s emerging economy.

Not everyone can see it.

If you are keen though, you’ll realize Africa’s informal economy is an open playbook on how to innovate, build and scale successful products and services for the emerging African consumers. Ask me how I know, and I’ll point you to the little known story of prepaid airtime currency re-sellers in Africa who, by cobbling up a rudimentary hack, were able to model a country-wide money transfer network, that would later be adopted by Africa’s telecommunication companies (Telco), spun off into a massive revenue generating business to eventually dethrone the monopoly of banks in East Africa.

But the real story is neither about airtime, nor Telcos. What it is really about are the lessons we can draw upon Africa’s informal economy on how to approach innovation in Africa.

This is a story of how the prepaid airtime re-sellers of Africa not only birthed mPesa, and mobile money, but an innovation playbook for Africa’s emerging economy.

Continue reading “How Africa’s Airtime Currency Traders Birthed A Fintech Innovation Playbook”

Why African Fintech Wants To Digitize Chamas, But Can’t Seem To Get It Right

Why is the digitization of Chama groups so valuable for Fintechs and Telcos and Banks? And more interestingly, why is it such a tough nut to crack?

 

A group of high profile organizations including Facebook, Mastercard, FSD Kenya, Safaricom, Fintech startups,  and even the World Bank have convened in Nairobi for a one day workshop to try figure out how to digitize the chama groups of East Africa. While it has been over a decade of digital financial inclusion estimated at 80%, none of them have figured out how to successfully digitize chama groups.

Just so we’re on the same page, I use chamas as a catchall for any group of people who come together with a shared goal, agree on a self governing mechanism and pool together resources such as time, labour or capital to achieve their shared aspirations. This simple form of self organization, self governance and chama identity makes it a highly flexible people-structure and why it exists in different forms across the world and Africa as Paare in Chad, Asusu in Nigeria or Chilemba in Zambia.

So why is the digitization of Chama groups so valuable for Fintechs and Telcos and Banks? And more interestingly, why is it such a tough nut to crack?

I found the answers to these questions from Toffene Karma, the one person who successfully digitized the social savings group of Chad West Africa known as Paare using a mobile product known as TigoPaare.

Continue reading “Why African Fintech Wants To Digitize Chamas, But Can’t Seem To Get It Right”

How Nairobi’s Matatus Defied the Will of Kenya’s Cashless Policy Makers

Nairobi’s failed cashless experiment, an attempt to digitize all commuter payments in Kenya is a poster child on the pattern of thinking that’s left a trail of struggling Fintech experiments in the name of Silicon Savannah.

 

We often fall into the trap of making broad sweeping assumptions about people and places based on our preconceived notions of an what we consider is an ideal world. In the context of East Africa and its bulging informal economy, countless technology entrepreneurs, policy makers, donor agencies and wazungu NGOs have fallen victim to throwing resources at reality hoping to turn it into their Utopian dream. Pick a sector, any sector – be it agriculture, transport, banking, ecommerce. Everything but the kitchen sink has been tried at perceived problems. I say perceived because the definition of the problem depends on who you ask.

Kenya’s short innovation history is littered with such experiments, typically ambitious, well funded but not lasting long before packing up.

Nairobi’s failed cashless experiment, an attempt to digitize all commuter payments in Kenya is a poster child on the pattern of thinking that’s left a trail of struggling Fintech experiments in the name of Silicon Savannah.

Continue reading “How Nairobi’s Matatus Defied the Will of Kenya’s Cashless Policy Makers”

Chamas are the Financial Side of Real World Social Networks

Chamas and social savings groups are the last barrier that protects people when all else is failing like banks, or government or social welfare.

Boda Boda Savings Group Meeting at Ruiru
Boda boda chama by Michael Kimani @pesa_africa

A picture worth 1000 words!

This picture was taken at Ruiru, a town about 20km beyond Nairobi city. What you see here is a group of motorcycles popularly known as boda bodas parked next to Wakini fueling station right outside Mama Lucy’s Deli on your way to Wa Matangi. The feel of this place is a blend between a pure rural and pure urban area – peri urban. Don’t be fooled by the dirt. So why are there 11 empty boda boda? Let me tell you why. Continue reading “Chamas are the Financial Side of Real World Social Networks”

Is Financial Inclusion in Africa Overrated?

People in Africa do not sleep and dream of having bank accounts. What they want is income to put in a bank account. Simply having a bank account gets you nowhere. Simply being cashless gets you nowhere.

Prepaid economy
Logo designed for The Prepaid Economy by Jennifer Mwaogwugwu 3/16/13

 This week I was honored be part of #WhatsNextFinclusion, a series put together by Metta on the state of the Fintech industry in Kenya and more importantly, the future. I was there on behalf of ChamaPesa – a ledger keeping app for social savings groups in Africa. Check out #ChamaPesa on twitter.

This year’s edition was sponsored by Mastercard and the moderator threw some pertinent questions at the panel. I, of course, have my own opinions from my own experience over the past 4 years – what i have observed as an analyst, user researcher, blogger and now co-founder of a startup in the space.

But, I thought it better to pose the same questions to some of the more experienced, brilliant minds from the continent that I have had the privilege to interact with, learn from and exchange ideas.  

What follows is a response from Mwalimu Nyerere – my friend and mentor – on the state of the financial inclusion industry in Kenya and Africa in the raw.  Nothing has been alter-rated so as to preserve the original thought and tone, only polished to give it flow.

Continue reading “Is Financial Inclusion in Africa Overrated?”

A Little Bit Of Perspective On ‘Financial Inclusion’ and the NGO World

Let me give you guys a little bit of perspective on “financial inclusion” , the NGO world and the never-ending headlines of saving the poor

The White Man's Burden
“The White Man’s Burden (Apologies to Rudyard Kipling)” Judge, 1 Nisan 1899, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum

Let me give you guys a little bit of perspective on “financial inclusion” , the NGO world and the never ending headlines of saving the poor.

There is a massive NGO network (con) built around the idea of “financial inclusion” – layered on the premise that the poor people of Kenya and Africa need loans and bank accounts.  This network is mainly funded by the Gates Foundation and major aid development agencies – UKAID, USAID et al.

Continue reading “A Little Bit Of Perspective On ‘Financial Inclusion’ and the NGO World”