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How Nairobi’s Matatus Defied the Will of Kenya’s Cashless Policy Makers

Nairobi’s failed cashless experiment, an attempt to digitize all commuter payments in Kenya is a poster child on the pattern of thinking that’s left a trail of struggling Fintech experiments in the name of Silicon Savannah.

 

We often fall into the trap of making broad sweeping assumptions about people and places based on our preconceived notions of an what we consider is an ideal world. In the context of East Africa and its bulging informal economy, countless technology entrepreneurs, policy makers, donor agencies and wazungu NGOs have fallen victim to throwing resources at reality hoping to turn it into their Utopian dream. Pick a sector, any sector – be it agriculture, transport, banking, ecommerce. Everything but the kitchen sink has been tried at perceived problems. I say perceived because the definition of the problem depends on who you ask.

Kenya’s short innovation history is littered with such experiments, typically ambitious, well funded but not lasting long before packing up.

Nairobi’s failed cashless experiment, an attempt to digitize all commuter payments in Kenya is a poster child on the pattern of thinking that’s left a trail of struggling Fintech experiments in the name of Silicon Savannah.

Continue reading “How Nairobi’s Matatus Defied the Will of Kenya’s Cashless Policy Makers”

How The Chinese, Africa’s Most Popular Browser , And A Bitcoin Mining Company Are About To Change African Payments

Africa’s most popular mobile browser, Opera is about to radically change the payments landscape in Africa.

China Loves Africa 2 by Michael Soi
Michael Soi’s China Loves Africa Collection

I think before this blog and thread, the global cryptocurrency community will not appreciate the strategic relevance of Bitmain’s $50 million investment round into one of Africa’s most popular Chinese owned mobile browser, Opera. What they will not see is the Fintech connection at play in East Africa, where the wildly successful mobile browser is creeping into digital financial services like mobile payments. For the payment professionals of East Africa, the pertinence of this investment on the future of their industry will not dawn on them perhaps until it is too late.

Last week’s SEC’s disclosure on Opera’s newest investor for their $115 million IPO, was the best strategic news on cryptocurrency ‘adoption’ in Africa I have seen in the last 5 years with far reaching implications on e-commerce, trade and payments for the region than appears at first glance.

My choice of a header image above accurately captures increasing Chinese influence on Kenya and Africa, at both state and commercial level.

Continue reading “How The Chinese, Africa’s Most Popular Browser , And A Bitcoin Mining Company Are About To Change African Payments”

How the Central Bank Of Kenya Plans To Regulate Bitcoin and Cryptocurrencies

Rather than fight change, the Central Bank of Kenya now seems to be reconsidering its stance on cryptocurrencies as a radically new way of high-speed, low-cost value transfer independent of traditional financial intermediaries.

Bitcoin and cryptocurrencies are a puzzle especially for regulators. Over the last 4 years our dear Central Bank Governor, Dr. Patrick Njoroge has consistently been opposed to the idea of cryptocurrencies. He issued 2 damning public notices warning the public to stay away and another circular expressly requesting banks to choke any value transfer activity related to cryptocurrencies.

As per the Central Bank of Kenya Act, he is well within his right. A bank is a regulated private business. You cannot compel a bank to take you as a customer or take your business. Thus, every once in a while, the governor pulls out his trump card to remind us who is boss.

But mounting pressure has pinned the old man against the wall, forcing him to revisit his dogmatism. An article from the Standard dated May 23rd titled “CBK Warms Up to Cryptocurrencies”  read

“CBK Governor Patrick Njoroge said the regulator was open to introducing cryptocurrencies such as bitcoin as alternative payment vehicles with the opportunity to reduce fraud.”

While in the past, all the the financial instruments that intermediary companies use for fund transfers were based on fiat currencies, in the forms of cash, bank deposits and electronic money – it is no longer the case with the advent of Bitcoin.

Rather than fight change, the Central Bank of Kenya now seems to be reconsidering its stance on cryptocurrencies as a radically new way of high-speed, low-cost value transfer independent of traditional financial intermediaries.

Continue reading “How the Central Bank Of Kenya Plans To Regulate Bitcoin and Cryptocurrencies”

Chamas are the Financial Side of Real World Social Networks

Chamas and social savings groups are the last barrier that protects people when all else is failing like banks, or government or social welfare.

Boda Boda Savings Group Meeting at Ruiru
Boda boda chama by Michael Kimani @pesa_africa

A picture worth 1000 words!

This picture was taken at Ruiru, a town about 20km beyond Nairobi city. What you see here is a group of motorcycles popularly known as boda bodas parked next to Wakini fueling station right outside Mama Lucy’s Deli on your way to Wa Matangi. The feel of this place is a blend between a pure rural and pure urban area – peri urban. Don’t be fooled by the dirt. So why are there 11 empty boda boda? Let me tell you why. Continue reading “Chamas are the Financial Side of Real World Social Networks”

Is Financial Inclusion in Africa Overrated?

People in Africa do not sleep and dream of having bank accounts. What they want is income to put in a bank account. Simply having a bank account gets you nowhere. Simply being cashless gets you nowhere.

Prepaid economy
Logo designed for The Prepaid Economy by Jennifer Mwaogwugwu 3/16/13

 This week I was honored be part of #WhatsNextFinclusion, a series put together by Metta on the state of the Fintech industry in Kenya and more importantly, the future. I was there on behalf of ChamaPesa – a ledger keeping app for social savings groups in Africa. Check out #ChamaPesa on twitter.

This year’s edition was sponsored by Mastercard and the moderator threw some pertinent questions at the panel. I, of course, have my own opinions from my own experience over the past 4 years – what i have observed as an analyst, user researcher, blogger and now co-founder of a startup in the space.

But, I thought it better to pose the same questions to some of the more experienced, brilliant minds from the continent that I have had the privilege to interact with, learn from and exchange ideas.  

What follows is a response from Mwalimu Nyerere – my friend and mentor – on the state of the financial inclusion industry in Kenya and Africa in the raw.  Nothing has been alter-rated so as to preserve the original thought and tone, only polished to give it flow.

Continue reading “Is Financial Inclusion in Africa Overrated?”

A Little Bit Of Perspective On ‘Financial Inclusion’ and the NGO World

Let me give you guys a little bit of perspective on “financial inclusion” , the NGO world and the never-ending headlines of saving the poor

The White Man's Burden
“The White Man’s Burden (Apologies to Rudyard Kipling)” Judge, 1 Nisan 1899, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum

Let me give you guys a little bit of perspective on “financial inclusion” , the NGO world and the never ending headlines of saving the poor.

There is a massive NGO network (con) built around the idea of “financial inclusion” – layered on the premise that the poor people of Kenya and Africa need loans and bank accounts.  This network is mainly funded by the Gates Foundation and major aid development agencies – UKAID, USAID et al.

Continue reading “A Little Bit Of Perspective On ‘Financial Inclusion’ and the NGO World”

How Kenya’s Digital Financial Inclusion Industry Is Failing Women Entrepreneurs

Mshwari & Mpesa is only half the story. The rest of it is happening offline, in cash and trust networks

Don’t get me wrong, the efforts by the Kenyan financial inclusion industry have not gone unnoticed. Without naming specifics, the industry’s greatest feat by far is building a wide accessible network for formal financial services.

But access is only one item on a long list. It doesn’t matter how many bank accounts you give to the poor. Heck, even throw in a bitcoin cryptocurrency bank account – 2 mobile banks, 5 traditional bank accounts and 2 cryptocurrency bank accounts. Access means nothing when you can’t put money in people’s pockets. I speak for all when I say Kenyan people want to be empowered, they want more pesa in their pockets period. And that’s ok!

So when I criticize the industry, I mean well.

If you’ve been up and about in Kenya, you will appreciate how pesa will almost always positively correlate to some sort of biashara opportunity and even more likely one in the informal sector

My assertion is there is an overall failure by Kenya’s financial inclusion industry to look beyond the digital personas of the people of East Africa’s informal economy. Whereas, much of their lives unravel offline in cash, trust and biashara networks.

Continue reading “How Kenya’s Digital Financial Inclusion Industry Is Failing Women Entrepreneurs”